Hunger: Finally Feeling It

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I sort of want to punch that stupid smarmy model

As anyone who read my last review knows (if you haven’t, here: https://thechosenblogger.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/gone-what-can-i-say/ ), I did not care much for Michael Grant’s novel, Gone. But I have to say that the second book, Hunger, is a vast improvement. Hunger picks up a few months after the end of Gone. Food is quickly running out, and people are starving. And what’s worse, Caine is being controlled by the Darkness, and he has a plan to feed it and increase its power.

I feel like this book did a few things better than Gone. The first was that the story focused more on the struggles of surviving in the book’s post-apocalyptic environment. I felt that Gone focused far too much on the conflict between Sam and Caine, partially because I didn’t find Caine very believable as a villain. This book, however, was mainly about Sam struggling to try and get enough food to feed the kids in Perdido Beach, with a subplot about Caine’s attempts to shut down the nuclear power plant. Even Caine’s plot is truly about the Darkness, not Caine himself, and the climactic battle is against the Darkness. I enjoyed the focus being on survival instead of the conflict with Caine. As I mentioned in my previous review, I love the concept of the series, and I’m glad the author is utilizing the possibilities of the scenario a little more.

Another improvement was the introduction of the Human Crew, a hate group formed against mutants. I like Zil and his friends as villains. Unlike Caine and Drake (who were just a little TOO evil), Zil and the others feel like real people. They’re just a bunch of kids trying to act tough and looking for respect. They’re bullies who don’t quite understand that the consequences of their action are far more severe when there are no adults to step in when things get ugly. I’m interested to see how this plotline plays out.

Thirdly, the characters are very well-developed. When I began to read the climax, I realized exactly how much I cared about Sam, Edilio, Brianna, and the rest.

(Spoilers)

I was terrified that Brianna would die of radiation poisoning, or that Lana would be kept by the Darkness. I was on the edge of my seat when Edilio, Dekka, and Diana were injured almost to the point of death. And even though I only knew him for a few pages, I ached for Duck’s self-sacrifice. The only character I couldn’t care less about was Astrid, who attempted to stop Zil from lynching a mutant by making a speech about Christian morality (it doesn’t work-shocker), then was captured by Zil because she is completely helpless and can’t do anything by herself.

(End Spoilers)

The female characters were a lot more well-written in this book. Astrid still didn’t get much to do aside from get kidnapped and yell about God, but she did take a little more initiative in this book, and I’m sure she’ll only get better. Lana was also a bit more proactive, but it didn’t end well. However, we are introduced to Dekka, an awesome and powerful black lesbian mutant, Brianna the Breeze, a self-assured mutant girl who thinks of herself as a superhero, and Brittney, a FAYZ soldier so dedicated that she literally refuses to die until her job is finished. They were smart, strong, and proactive in this book, and I think they’ll only get better.

That being said, Hunger still has some flaws. Remember before, when I mentioned that the focus of the plot was taken off of Caine, and instead, the main threat was the Darkness? And remember my last review when I talked about how the Darkness was not very scary or interesting to read about? That is still true. It’s a little creepy when the Darkness infiltrates Little Pete’s dreams, yes, but barely enough to even pique my interest. On top of that, the Darkness has no discernible motivation. For what purpose does the Darkness need the new body it’s trying to create? Why is it manipulating the kids of the FAYZ? And of course, when the villain of a story falls flat, the rest of the story tends to fall flat. This wasn’t quite the case here, but it came very close, saved only by the strength of the other characters.

I would like to make a quick note about the book’s Christo-religious themes. I didn’t really mind them at first, being Catholic myself (although seriously, there are no Jewish kids in Perdido Beach? No Hindus? No Muslims? Not even a committed atheist?). However, some of the things these kids say are not exactly realistic. I know from experience that when teenagers under pressure pray, it sounds more like “Ohgodohgodhelpmehelpme” than “St. Michael the Archangel, pray for us. We call upon you for our salvation.” And some of the religious speeches made by the characters (Astrid in particular, though Brittney is also guilty of this) are a bit preachy and overdramatic. These incidents are becoming more and more common, and whenever this occurs, it takes me out of the story.

This book improved upon its predecessor from both a feminist standpoint and a story standpoint, but I still don’t want to rank it above a Good. Hunger is definitely better than Gone, but it didn’t quite reach Very Good level. However, I put it down excited to continue the story, which is much more than I can say for the first book.

Second Opinions:

http://simonbohun.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/hunger-by-michael-grant/

http://ashleighonline.wordpress.com/2013/02/17/hunger-by-michael-grant-review/

http://charlotteunsworth.wordpress.com/2013/04/30/review-hunger-lies-and-plague-by-michael-grant/

Questions?  Comments?  Complaints?  Concerns?  Please comment!  I LOVE constructive criticism!

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2 thoughts on “Hunger: Finally Feeling It

  1. HOLLY says:

    Great review! I love reading other people’s reviews, because it gives another thought process and perspective on the story. Personally, I thought that Gone was better than Hunger, but you make some really good and persuasive points! Will you also be reviewing the rest of the books in the series?

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